A logo in the making – Research and sketching

With the launch of the ‘100 Ideas’ project it was going to be difficult since we only had a week. However we would need to get used to producing ideas and sketches ten times quicker than usual since we would be entering the very productive design world in the very near future. After producing thirty-two sketches I had only realised how difficult producing ideas would be.

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In the middle of producing these sketches I began to think that a great deal of them looked quite like the Pi sign with how they were joined up. Many of them were simple and some of them were extremely creative and graphically interesting. I also noticed that a few looked similar to the branding for the Olympic Games, and the branding for Portaventura, a theme park near Barcelona, Spain.

After a group tutorial I got a sense of where I should have been heading with this project. Instead of combining my initials together and making interesting shapes and images, I instead needed to focus on adding imagery that represented me. I also decided to add words. Going forward I conducted some brief research into digital line illustrations. What I like about these line illustrations is how detailed yet simple they are. They don’t clutter the space and they are perfect for fitting into the size of a postage stamp. They’re family friendly, simple, yet playful, and modern, yet timeless.

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CSAD Degree Show 2017

In the lead up to the deadline of the editorial project, ‘Changing Faces’, for the first year group, we all attended the spectacular showings of third year work from all disciplines within the Cardiff School of Art & Design. I could not describe how impressive some of the pieces of work were. The degree show presented just how much dedication and effort students can put into their work in order to seek a career, commissions from various people, or even into further education. The exhibition and students websites/blogs are their stepping stone to showing just how much they’re made of. All the disciplines presented such high quality of energy and enthusiasm through students’ choices of materials, tools, and process of production. Below are several pieces which caught my eye.

I have selected three pieces of work from the exhibition that most caught my eye and intrigued me.

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The first piece of work I saw was a piece of ceramic work by Fflur Green who studied BA (Hons) Ceramics.

Pieces of vibrantly coloured coral made of ceramic material were carefully placed on the wall. She described that her work was to show the fragility of life and the importance of death. She wanted to celebrate this fragility through a different yet therepeutic perspective.

The bright colours which are associated with the coral reef were carefully considered to essentially bring life and strength to her work. The fragility is presented through the vulnerable material of ceramics as well as the fragility of life and the coral reef. She wanted to trigger an array of emotions for the viewer.

What I liked about this piece was how the work was presented. I liked the textures that were created with materials and tools in the production of the work, the colour used to show that it represented coral, and how she considered elements in life to bring this piece together. I can imagine using coral as an example of a fragile being could have been quite challenging.

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The second piece of work that I’ve chosen to analyse was a photograph taken by Zara Jackson, as part of the BA (Hons) Photographic Practice course in Brigend.

This is a photograph of Sugar glass with a drop of food colouring. She didn’t describe how she took the photo or for what the photo represented. Jackson described that she likes to create work that makes people question, is unusual to the eye and is slightly different.

What caught my eye with this photograph was the vibrancy and contrast between clarity and blurriness. The composition of the photograph made me think it was made to look like a cliff or mountain. I like how it doesn’t completely look like a photograph because of the use of a macro lens, which is was drew me closer into the photograph and making me wonder what it was. I wouldn’t have known this was sugar glass with food colouring if the photographer hadn’t mentioned it in the caption below it in the exhibition.

The third piece I chose to look at was by BA (Hons) Illustration student Rebecca Woolmer. The collection of work was titles Narcissus.

Woolmer described that the collection was inspired by both ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ and the myth of Narcissus. It explored the ‘fluctuating’ and ‘illusory’ nature human identity . She described how the boundaries between humans and technology have blurred which has made it more difficult to distinguish the difference between what is real and what is virtual. This has entailed the increasing obsession to achieve a construct of oneself that does not exist.

What caught my eye with this work was how the illustrations were presented in the book and on the wall. The incredible mixture of lines and colours was what intrigued me into looking closer into what the illustrator was trying to present to the viewer. I love the drawings and the concept that has been created.